This week on Eating Disorder hosts Crazy Legs Conti and The Rev Spyro open up the show with a mysterious sound clip tease for the coming episode - Twinkies! After catching up for a minute, the guys welcome Steve Ettlinger to the program, author of “Twinkie, Deconstructed.” Talking about Steve’s past writing about beer and champagne, the conversation welcomes Steve’s daughter, Chelsea, to the show as well. Spyro and Crazy Legs recall their mothers packing lunch with strange items but agree that the Twinkie was the most iconic of desserts. Starting on a very informative discussion about Twinkies, how they’re made, bizarre ingredients, and nearly everything else, Steve shares a multitude of stories about his research on the Hostess cake. After the break, the group takes on the infamous Fruit Pie snack and Crazy Legs shares his escapades with the snacks through his competitive eating career. Tune in for a great show to learn all you ever wanted about the nostalgic sweets! This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

This week on Eating Disorder hosts Crazy Legs Conti and The Rev Spyro open up the show with a mysterious sound clip tease for the coming episode - Twinkies! After catching up for a minute, the guys welcome Steve Ettlinger to the program, author of “Twinkie, Deconstructed.” Talking about Steve’s past writing about beer and champagne, the conversation welcomes Steve’s daughter, Chelsea, to the show as well. Spyro and Crazy Legs recall their mothers packing lunch with strange items but agree that the Twinkie was the most iconic of desserts. Starting on a very informative discussion about Twinkies, how they’re made, bizarre ingredients, and nearly everything else, Steve shares a multitude of stories about his research on the Hostess cake. After the break, the group takes on the infamous Fruit Pie snack and Crazy Legs shares his escapades with the snacks through his competitive eating career. Tune in for a great show to learn all you ever wanted about the nostalgic sweets! This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

This week on Fuhmentaboudit!, hosts Mary Izett and Chris Cuzme open up with some exciting events coming up, including New York Cider Week, before welcoming guests Elena Balletta and Shamus Jones in this first ever pickle themed episode. The operations manager and executive briner of Brooklyn Brine respectively, the duo shares with Mary and Chris how they got their start pickling and expand on the process of brining their pickles. After the break, the group talks about their ties with Dogfish Head Brewery as well as Brooklyn Brine’s trials and tribulations exploring various ingredients. This small business operation is on the rise both nationally and internationally, so tune in to find out where you can get Brooklyn Brine products of your very own! This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

This week on Fuhmentaboudit!, hosts Mary Izett and Chris Cuzme open up with some exciting events coming up, including New York Cider Week, before welcoming guests Elena Balletta and Shamus Jones in this first ever pickle themed episode. The operations manager and executive briner of Brooklyn Brine respectively, the duo shares with Mary and Chris how they got their start pickling and expand on the process of brining their pickles. After the break, the group talks about their ties with Dogfish Head Brewery as well as Brooklyn Brine’s trials and tribulations exploring various ingredients. This small business operation is on the rise both nationally and internationally, so tune in to find out where you can get Brooklyn Brine products of your very own! This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

This week on Animal Instinct, host Celia Kutcher welcomes Maggie Howell, Executive Director of the Wolf Conversation Center (WCC) located in South Salem, NY. The Wolf Conversation Center’s mission is to promote wolf conservation by teaching about wolves, their relationship to the environment, and the human role in protecting their future. The main voice of the WCC, Maggie’s interest and experience with wildlife runs deep. Growing up in New York City, Maggie visited her local veterinarian more often than her pediatrician, routinely bringing in injured city “wildlife” she had rescued. She continued her studies more formally at Vassar, earning a degree in biology, focusing on animal behavior. Chatting plenty of wolf basics with Celia, Maggie also explains the genetic similarities between wolves and common dogs as well as the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park. Tune in to learn all about this remarkable animal and the great things happening at the Wolf Conversation Center. This program was brought to you by Heritage Foods USA.

This week on Animal Instinct, host Celia Kutcher welcomes Maggie Howell, Executive Director of the Wolf Conversation Center (WCC) located in South Salem, NY. The Wolf Conversation Center’s mission is to promote wolf conservation by teaching about wolves, their relationship to the environment, and the human role in protecting their future. The main voice of the WCC, Maggie’s interest and experience with wildlife runs deep. Growing up in New York City, Maggie visited her local veterinarian more often than her pediatrician, routinely bringing in injured city “wildlife” she had rescued. She continued her studies more formally at Vassar, earning a degree in biology, focusing on animal behavior. Chatting plenty of wolf basics with Celia, Maggie also explains the genetic similarities between wolves and common dogs as well as the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park. Tune in to learn all about this remarkable animal and the great things happening at the Wolf Conversation Center. This program was brought to you by Heritage Foods USA.

This week Cutting the Curd is continuing its series on cheese and art. Host Greg Blais and co-host Emily Acosta delve into the interesting topic of breast milk cheese with artist Miriam Simun, who has personal experience in this realm. Having started the human cheese project in order to provoke a space for discourse around norms and practices with regard to human exceptionalism, food production, emerging bioavailabilities, and the commodification of bodies, Miriam brings up many questions surrounding the topic that remain to be answered. She goes on to explain how she went about completing the human cheese project with recruiting volunteers to provide necessary ingredients, the actual cheese-making process and the ethics considered with the project. This program was brought to you by The Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.

This week Cutting the Curd is continuing its series on cheese and art. Host Greg Blais and co-host Emily Acosta delve into the interesting topic of breast milk cheese with artist Miriam Simun, who has personal experience in this realm. Having started the human cheese project in order to provoke a space for discourse around norms and practices with regard to human exceptionalism, food production, emerging bioavailabilities, and the commodification of bodies, Miriam brings up many questions surrounding the topic that remain to be answered. She goes on to explain how she went about completing the human cheese project with recruiting volunteers to provide necessary ingredients, the actual cheese-making process and the ethics considered with the project. This program was brought to you by The Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board.

This week on We Dig Plants, hosts Carmen DeVito and Alice Marcus Krieg are talking about the ‘20 to 30 something’ gardeners of the millennial generation. Speaking first to Dana Frigerio who is based in Italy with the digital magazine, Blossom zine, about targeting the younger generation. Blossom is a digital magazine that is dedicated to anything green, from gardening to design, vegetarian and traditional cooking, fashion, botany, and flowers. After the break, Carmen and Alice chat with Dee Nash from Red Dirt Ramblings, the home and garden blog. Carmen recently wrote the book The 20-30 Something Garden Guide. As it turns out, Dee has millennial aged children and found that many of the generation do not know how to garden or even have a basic understanding of having a green thumb, and this inspired her to try and rectify this. Explaining how important it is to pass on the passion to grow things, Dee also shares her methods for gathering research and some of the highlighted facts she learned in the process. Tune in for a great show focusing on the future of gardening with some insightful advice thrown in there as well! This program was brought to you by Rolling Press.

This week on We Dig Plants, hosts Carmen DeVito and Alice Marcus Krieg are talking about the ‘20 to 30 something’ gardeners of the millennial generation. Speaking first to Dana Frigerio who is based in Italy with the digital magazine, Blossom zine, about targeting the younger generation. Blossom is a digital magazine that is dedicated to anything green, from gardening to design, vegetarian and traditional cooking, fashion, botany, and flowers. After the break, Carmen and Alice chat with Dee Nash from Red Dirt Ramblings, the home and garden blog. Carmen recently wrote the book The 20-30 Something Garden Guide. As it turns out, Dee has millennial aged children and found that many of the generation do not know how to garden or even have a basic understanding of having a green thumb, and this inspired her to try and rectify this. Explaining how important it is to pass on the passion to grow things, Dee also shares her methods for gathering research and some of the highlighted facts she learned in the process. Tune in for a great show focusing on the future of gardening with some insightful advice thrown in there as well! This program was brought to you by Rolling Press.

Ruth Reichl is the author of Delicious! a novel published by Random House in May 2014. She was Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine from 1999 to 2009. Before that she was the restaurant critic of both The New York Times(1993-1999) and the Los Angeles Times (1984-1993), where she was also named food editor. As co-owner of The Swallow Restaurant from 1974 to 1977, she played a part in the culinary revolution that took place in Berkeley, California. In the years that followed, she served as restaurant critic for New West and California magazines.
Ms. Reichl began writing about food in 1972, when she published Mmmmm: A Feastiary. Since then, she has authored the critically acclaimed, best-selling memoirs Tender at the Bone, Comfort Me with Apples, Garlic and Sapphires, and For You Mom, Finally, which have been translated into 18 languages. She is the editor of The Modern Library Food Series, which currently includes ten books. She has also written the introductions to Nancy Silverton’s Breads from the La Brea Bakery: Recipes for the Connoisseur (1996) and The Measure of Her Powers: An M.F.K. Fisher Reader (2000), and the forewords for Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, by Shizuo Tsuji (2007), At Elizabeth David’s Table (2011) and . She is featured on the cover of Dining Out: Secrets from America’s Leading Critics, Chefs and Restaurants, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (1998). She is the editor of Endless Feasts: Sixty Years of Writing from Gourmet; Remembrance of Things Paris: Sixty Years of Writing from Gourmet; The Gourmet Cookbook, released September 2004; History in a Glass: Sixty Years of Wine Writing from Gourmet, 2006 and Gourmet Today, September 2009. Her lecture “Why Food Matters,” delivered in October 2005, was published in The Tanner Lectures on Human Values, Volume 27, in 2006. In March 2007, she delivered the J. Edward Farnum Lecture at Princeton University.
Ms. Reichl hosted Eating Out Loud, three specials on Food Network, covering New York (2002), San Francisco (2003), and Miami (2003). She is the executive producer of Gourmet’s Diary of a Foodie, public television’s 30-episode series, which debuted in October 2006 and Executive Producer and host of Gourmet’s Adventures with Ruth, a 10-episode public television series which began airing in October 2009. She is currently a judge on Top Chef Masters.

Ms. Reichl has been honored with 6 James Beard Awards (one for magazine feature writing and one for multimedia food journalism in 2009; two for restaurant criticism, in 1996 and 1998; one for journalism, in 1994; and Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America, 1984. In 2007, she was named Adweek’s Editor of the Year. She received the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, presented by the Missouri School of Journalism, in October 2007. Ms. Reichl received the 2008 Matrix Award for Magazines from New York Women in Communications, Inc., in April 2008. She holds a B.A. and an M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Michigan and lives in Upstate New York with her husband, Michael Singer, a television news producer.

Ruth Reichl is the author of Delicious! a novel published by Random House in May 2014. She was Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine from 1999 to 2009. Before that she was the restaurant critic of both The New York Times(1993-1999) and the Los Angeles Times (1984-1993), where she was also named food editor. As co-owner of The Swallow Restaurant from 1974 to 1977, she played a part in the culinary revolution that took place in Berkeley, California. In the years that followed, she served as restaurant critic for New West and California magazines.

Ms. Reichl began writing about food in 1972, when she published Mmmmm: A Feastiary. Since then, she has authored the critically acclaimed, best-selling memoirs Tender at the Bone, Comfort Me with Apples, Garlic and Sapphires, and For You Mom, Finally, which have been translated into 18 languages. She is the editor of The Modern Library Food Series, which currently includes ten books. She has also written the introductions to Nancy Silverton’s Breads from the La Brea Bakery: Recipes for the Connoisseur (1996) and The Measure of Her Powers: An M.F.K. Fisher Reader (2000), and the forewords for Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, by Shizuo Tsuji (2007), At Elizabeth David’s Table (2011) and . She is featured on the cover of Dining Out: Secrets from America’s Leading Critics, Chefs and Restaurants, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (1998). She is the editor of Endless Feasts: Sixty Years of Writing from Gourmet; Remembrance of Things Paris: Sixty Years of Writing from Gourmet; The Gourmet Cookbook, released September 2004; History in a Glass: Sixty Years of Wine Writing from Gourmet, 2006 and Gourmet Today, September 2009. Her lecture “Why Food Matters,” delivered in October 2005, was published in The Tanner Lectures on Human Values, Volume 27, in 2006. In March 2007, she delivered the J. Edward Farnum Lecture at Princeton University.

Ms. Reichl hosted Eating Out Loud, three specials on Food Network, covering New York (2002), San Francisco (2003), and Miami (2003). She is the executive producer of Gourmet’s Diary of a Foodie, public television’s 30-episode series, which debuted in October 2006 and Executive Producer and host of Gourmet’s Adventures with Ruth, a 10-episode public television series which began airing in October 2009. She is currently a judge on Top Chef Masters.

Ms. Reichl has been honored with 6 James Beard Awards (one for magazine feature writing and one for multimedia food journalism in 2009; two for restaurant criticism, in 1996 and 1998; one for journalism, in 1994; and Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America, 1984. In 2007, she was named Adweek’s Editor of the Year. She received the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, presented by the Missouri School of Journalism, in October 2007. Ms. Reichl received the 2008 Matrix Award for Magazines from New York Women in Communications, Inc., in April 2008. She holds a B.A. and an M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Michigan and lives in Upstate New York with her husband, Michael Singer, a television news producer.

This week on What Doesn’t Kill You, host Katy Kieffer is talking beef and welcomes guest Nicolette Hahn Niman to the program. Nicolette is a rancher, attorney, and writer. Much of her time is spent speaking and writing about the problems of industrialized livestock production, including the book Righteous Porkchop: Finding a Life and Good Food Beyond Factory Farms and four essays she has written on the subject for the New York Times. She has written for Huffington Post, CHOW, and Earth Island Journal. Previously, she was the senior attorney for the environmental organization Waterkeeper Alliance, where she was in charge of the organization’s campaign to reform the concentrated livestock and poultry industry, and, before that, an attorney for National Wildlife Federation. She joins Katy today to talk about her newest book, Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat Production. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

This week on What Doesn’t Kill You, host Katy Kieffer is talking beef and welcomes guest Nicolette Hahn Niman to the program. Nicolette is a rancher, attorney, and writer. Much of her time is spent speaking and writing about the problems of industrialized livestock production, including the book Righteous Porkchop: Finding a Life and Good Food Beyond Factory Farms and four essays she has written on the subject for the New York Times. She has written for Huffington Post, CHOW, and Earth Island Journal. Previously, she was the senior attorney for the environmental organization Waterkeeper Alliance, where she was in charge of the organization’s campaign to reform the concentrated livestock and poultry industry, and, before that, an attorney for National Wildlife Federation. She joins Katy today to talk about her newest book, Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat Production. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

What community isn’t proud of its school trophies? Across Georgia, there’s a new kind of prize that recognizes exemplary work in farm-to-school, named after a tasty local vegetable. And winning at any level—gold, silver, or bronze—can generate the kind of excitement and support that a good school meals program deserves. This program was brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

What community isn’t proud of its school trophies? Across Georgia, there’s a new kind of prize that recognizes exemplary work in farm-to-school, named after a tasty local vegetable. And winning at any level—gold, silver, or bronze—can generate the kind of excitement and support that a good school meals program deserves. This program was brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

This week on Wild Game Domain, host Chad Pagano is talking wild game recipes! Kicking off the show, Chad checks in and shares that while the show has recently gotten away from discussing food and cooking, today he’s bringing it back. He goes on to acknowledge that while not everyone is a hunter, it doesn’t mean that wild game can’t be enjoyed by all. With several purveyors of wild game meat in the market, it is easy enough to come across quality venison, quail, or pheasant, for example, for order. Tune in to hear some great recipes for venison loin and chili, cornbread, and other delicious tidbits. This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

This week on Wild Game Domain, host Chad Pagano is talking wild game recipes! Kicking off the show, Chad checks in and shares that while the show has recently gotten away from discussing food and cooking, today he’s bringing it back. He goes on to acknowledge that while not everyone is a hunter, it doesn’t mean that wild game can’t be enjoyed by all. With several purveyors of wild game meat in the market, it is easy enough to come across quality venison, quail, or pheasant, for example, for order. Tune in to hear some great recipes for venison loin and chili, cornbread, and other delicious tidbits. This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

This week on the Joshua David Stein Variety Hour… Half Hour, host Joshua David Stein is talking critic on critic on critic. Kicking off the show with the beloved Food Poem in an English Accent segment, Joshua welcomes longtime restaurant critic, Moira Hodgson, with a beautiful reading of a poem entitled, “Onion.” Joshua later brings New York Magazine critic, Adam Platt, on the show via phone to talk about their common craft of critiquing. They discuss the true role of the food critic, whether they are expected to discover new places or continue to comment on old places and gets Adam’s take on the conundrum. Depending on each publication’s spin on food reviews plus the trendiness of chefs and restaurants, Joshua and Adam agree that many magazines that have an online presence prefer what’s new and hip (the “hamster wheel of newness”). In the second half of the show, Joshua schools us with a little ethnomusicology and takes listeners on a musical turkey hunt. Tune in for a great show! This program was brought to you by Roberta’s Pizza.

This week on the Joshua David Stein Variety Hour… Half Hour, host Joshua David Stein is talking critic on critic on critic. Kicking off the show with the beloved Food Poem in an English Accent segment, Joshua welcomes longtime restaurant critic, Moira Hodgson, with a beautiful reading of a poem entitled, “Onion.” Joshua later brings New York Magazine critic, Adam Platt, on the show via phone to talk about their common craft of critiquing. They discuss the true role of the food critic, whether they are expected to discover new places or continue to comment on old places and gets Adam’s take on the conundrum. Depending on each publication’s spin on food reviews plus the trendiness of chefs and restaurants, Joshua and Adam agree that many magazines that have an online presence prefer what’s new and hip (the “hamster wheel of newness”). In the second half of the show, Joshua schools us with a little ethnomusicology and takes listeners on a musical turkey hunt. Tune in for a great show! This program was brought to you by Roberta’s Pizza.

This week on The Morning After, host Jessie Kiefer is back joining co-host Sari Kamin for an episode welcoming chefs Jose Ramirez-Ruiz and Pam Yung of Semilla restaurant in Williamsburg, NYC. Kicking off the show with some food news, Sari talks headlines regarding NASA, President Obama’s credit card being declined at a NYC restaurant, and new dating sites for those with dietary restrictions. After the break, Jose and Pam talk opening their first brick and mortar restaurant less than a week ago! Both boast a stacked resume, but also talk about the pop up restaurant, Chez Jose, that evolved into the newly opened Semilla. Notably, at Semilla the chefs cook vegetables, mainly, and this stirs a great conversation about their goals to change the current food system. They go on to explain that they aren’t shy about meat or fish, but their ingredients are based solely on the best of what’s available from their farmers and are seasonal. Moreover, Jose and Pam purposely set up the restaurant’s seating around an 18-seat central bar with an emphasis on communal style dining to provoke conversation and interaction. Tune in to hear more from these culinary innovators and to find out how they do on The Morning After quiz! This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

This week on The Morning After, host Jessie Kiefer is back joining co-host Sari Kamin for an episode welcoming chefs Jose Ramirez-Ruiz and Pam Yung of Semilla restaurant in Williamsburg, NYC. Kicking off the show with some food news, Sari talks headlines regarding NASA, President Obama’s credit card being declined at a NYC restaurant, and new dating sites for those with dietary restrictions. After the break, Jose and Pam talk opening their first brick and mortar restaurant less than a week ago! Both boast a stacked resume, but also talk about the pop up restaurant, Chez Jose, that evolved into the newly opened Semilla. Notably, at Semilla the chefs cook vegetables, mainly, and this stirs a great conversation about their goals to change the current food system. They go on to explain that they aren’t shy about meat or fish, but their ingredients are based solely on the best of what’s available from their farmers and are seasonal. Moreover, Jose and Pam purposely set up the restaurant’s seating around an 18-seat central bar with an emphasis on communal style dining to provoke conversation and interaction. Tune in to hear more from these culinary innovators and to find out how they do on The Morning After quiz! This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

This week on Arts & Seizures, hosts Mike Edison and Judy McGuire kick off the show catching up with Judy’s latest travels in the south. Quickly introducing guest Thomas R. Pryor, author of the book “I Hate the Dallas Cowboys: Tales of a Scrappy New York Boyhood,” he is a native New Yorker and jumps into conversation with Mike and Judy about growing up in the city and how things used to be. Thomas’ 1960s working class neighborhood on the Upper East Side sets the stage for many great stories of his upbringing where he played street games like Ringalario and delt with nuns disciplining him for humming baseball beer jingles in class. Combining funny and bittersweet stories of his childhood, he shares some wonderful highlights of the book with Mike and Judy. This program was brought to you by Roberta’s Pizza.

This week on Arts & Seizures, hosts Mike Edison and Judy McGuire kick off the show catching up with Judy’s latest travels in the south. Quickly introducing guest Thomas R. Pryor, author of the book “I Hate the Dallas Cowboys: Tales of a Scrappy New York Boyhood,” he is a native New Yorker and jumps into conversation with Mike and Judy about growing up in the city and how things used to be. Thomas’ 1960s working class neighborhood on the Upper East Side sets the stage for many great stories of his upbringing where he played street games like Ringalario and delt with nuns disciplining him for humming baseball beer jingles in class. Combining funny and bittersweet stories of his childhood, he shares some wonderful highlights of the book with Mike and Judy. This program was brought to you by Roberta’s Pizza.

This week on Eat Your Words, host Cathy Erway is talking with author Suzanne Cope about her new book Small Batch: Pickles, Cheese, Chocolate, Spirits, and the Return of Artisanal Foods. Along for the episode, Suzanne is joined by Laena McCarthy, Marisa Wu, and Brian Ballan, who are some of the producers featured in Suzanne’s book. Marisa Wu is a founder of Salty Road taffy, Laena is the founder of Anarchy in a Jar, and Brian Ballan runs A & B American Style condiments. All of these guys specialize in small batch food. Chatting about the boom of artisanal foods, they explain the concept of “co-op-etition.” This term refers to the small businesses working together and networking in order to help each come up in the food world. Also discussing what it really means to be considered artisanal, the topic of being officially certified as organic is touched upon, plus a lot more. Tune in to hear why these small batch businesses do what they do and what they have planned for the future. This program was brought to you by Rolling Press.

This week on Eat Your Words, host Cathy Erway is talking with author Suzanne Cope about her new book Small Batch: Pickles, Cheese, Chocolate, Spirits, and the Return of Artisanal Foods. Along for the episode, Suzanne is joined by Laena McCarthy, Marisa Wu, and Brian Ballan, who are some of the producers featured in Suzanne’s book. Marisa Wu is a founder of Salty Road taffy, Laena is the founder of Anarchy in a Jar, and Brian Ballan runs A & B American Style condiments. All of these guys specialize in small batch food. Chatting about the boom of artisanal foods, they explain the concept of “co-op-etition.” This term refers to the small businesses working together and networking in order to help each come up in the food world. Also discussing what it really means to be considered artisanal, the topic of being officially certified as organic is touched upon, plus a lot more. Tune in to hear why these small batch businesses do what they do and what they have planned for the future. This program was brought to you by Rolling Press.

This week on a brand new The Main Course, host Patrick Martins is in the studio speaking with Fortunato Nicotra, Executive Chef of Felidia in New York City. Initially arriving in NYC to work for celebrity chef Lidia Bastianich in 1995, he notably took her flagship restaurant to earn three stars from Ruth Reichl from the New York Times in only three months time. Through countless awards and recognitions, Fortunato tells Patrick how he came up through the culinary world. By keeping his Sicilian roots close to his food, he cooked his way through Italy, working in several restaurants in Northern Italy as well as in Sicily. Chef Nicotra has appeared on numerous food television shows, including Food Network’s Iron Chef and even shares with Patrick his story of preparing several meals for Pope Benedict XVI. Tune in to hear all about this accomplished chef, plus what he has planned for the future. This program was brought to you by The International Culinary Center.

This week on a brand new The Main Course, host Patrick Martins is in the studio speaking with Fortunato Nicotra, Executive Chef of Felidia in New York City. Initially arriving in NYC to work for celebrity chef Lidia Bastianich in 1995, he notably took her flagship restaurant to earn three stars from Ruth Reichl from the New York Times in only three months time. Through countless awards and recognitions, Fortunato tells Patrick how he came up through the culinary world. By keeping his Sicilian roots close to his food, he cooked his way through Italy, working in several restaurants in Northern Italy as well as in Sicily. Chef Nicotra has appeared on numerous food television shows, including Food Network’s Iron Chef and even shares with Patrick his story of preparing several meals for Pope Benedict XVI. Tune in to hear all about this accomplished chef, plus what he has planned for the future. This program was brought to you by The International Culinary Center.